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The Amazon Insider – Part one

The first part of a regular series on ‘The Amazon Insider’

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How YouTubers Make Money with Merch

There’s a reason why every big YouTube creator has gotten into the business of selling merchandise.

I’m sure you’ve seen it. Take for example SimplyNailogical’s Halo Taco brand, a line of premium nail polish in gorgeous finishes and colors. Or Chamberlain Coffee, which started with cold brew bags and has expanded to apparel, matcha, and coffee accessories. On the Mythical store, you can find items including shirts, hair products, and kitchen towels.

These creators know that they’re running a business, and a successful business finds ways to diversify its revenue. 

Relying on advertising and brand deals can be fickle—it comes down to the whims of third parties and algorithms. And, as we know, there’s a history of platforms simply disappearing overnight (RIP Vine).

More than ever, YouTube creators are also realising that selling merchandise and other products can bring big returns while also energising their fan base. And the best part is that the creator is in full control, including designing the merch, running the shop, and promoting their goods. No algorithm is required.

You don’t need millions of subscribers to start selling—in fact, starting early can help grow your channel. Read on to find out why you should start selling merch and how to get started.

How to make merch—and money—as a YouTuber

As a creator, you already have the skills to get your own merch shop up and running to support your business. Read on to learn how to make merch for YouTube.

Why you should sell merch as a YouTuber

From the outside looking in, being a content creator on YouTube sounds like the ultimate way to achieve career freedom. But the truth is more complicated.

Creators on any platform are too often beholden to other people or companies, whether that’s pleasing YouTube’s requirements for becoming a partner who can run ads, or courting brand deals. Making money as a creator this way means playing by someone else’s rules.

The traditional way to make money on YouTube is through the partner programs, but that has requirements.

Currently, to join the partner program, you need at a minimum:

  • 1,000 subscribers
  • 4,000 valid public watch hours in the last 12 months
  • No active community guidelines strikes on your channel
  • To be compliant with YouTube’s monetisation policies
  • To live in a country where the program is available

Only then can you apply, and even then, admission isn’t guaranteed. If you are accepted, YouTube is free to suspend your ad revenue or even suspend or remove your channel if it decides you’ve broken a rule.

Getting into the program requires clearing a big hurdle and then leaving your fate in the hands of YouTube’s automated moderation, which has in the past been accused of wrongly demonetising creators

What’s become clear is that YouTube creators who make it big know how to protect their independence.

Truly owning your business as a creator means taking back control from YouTube, and merch is one way to get there.

Creating and selling products is a revenue stream that you have full control over, which means you also reap all the rewards. You can set up a store on your own without negotiations or contracts while retaining full autonomy of your brand and values.

For fans, it also offers a way to support you while getting something in return that also has the added bonus of promoting your channel.

By selling merch, you maintain a revenue stream that is protected from these issues and that you can start without needing to be in the partner program. That means you can start making money even with a lower subscriber count.

Truly owning your business as a creator means taking back control from YouTube, and merch is one way to get there. It even has the possibility to surpass what you make from ads.

What to sell as a YouTube creator

Broadly speaking, there are two categories of items you can consider selling as a YouTube creator: fan merchandise and products that you create. There are pros and cons to each approach, and a long-term strategy is to consider how to sell both.

Selling fan merchandise

Creating traditional merchandise is the classic way to offer products to fans. Think of the shirts you can buy at a concert or a branded water bottle. These are items that carry slogans or images associated with your channel that fans can wear and use to show support for your work as a creator.

These can include:

  • T-shirts
  • Hoodies
  • Hats
  • Mugs
  • Stickers
  • Patches
  • Enamel pins

Basically anything you can print with your branding is a good candidate for merch.

Scott Walter, is the creator behind Miniac a channel with 303,000 subscribers that focuses on the miniature figurine hobby. On his channel, he posts about table-top gaming and the intricate art of painting miniatures. He’s successfully carved out a niche on YouTube and has a store to go along with it that sells both merch for fans and products for fellow miniature enthusiasts.

His offerings include shirts and hats inspired by both miniatures and his love of metal music.

The benefits of this sort of fan merch is that it’s generally easy to create, especially with on-demand printing options (which we’ll talk about later). This also means the merch can be very cost effective—with so many options out there for printing merch, you don’t have to worry about sourcing original products, keeping an inventory, or even dealing with shipping if you use an on-demand service. All of that saves you both time and money.

There’s also an established market for these products. Fans already know to look for these items and probably have already bought them in the past from other creators or media that they’re a fan of. Plus, every time a fan wears or uses your merch, it’s advertising for your channel to their friends and family.

The downside is that these aren’t the most unique offerings. But you can improve that by focusing on creating exclusive and interesting designs. These products are also typically lower-cost for fans, so your revenue per item may be lower than a product you’ve made yourself.

Selling products you create

Creating your own products from scratch have the potential to bring in higher revenue, but they take a lot more work.

We’ve seen this in some of the other examples mentioned, like Holo Taco, Chamberlain Coffee, or makeup palettes. These are products that were desgined, sourced, manufactured, and sold by the creator who owns them.

All of this takes time and money, which, as a small creator, you may be short on, but there are still ways to make it happen. Rather, you can start with something less complex. Think of what your niche is as a creator and how you can share that with your fans. 

Creating products could be as simple as:

  • PDF instructions for a craft or project
  • Handmade items like jewelry
  • Workshops or one-on-one lessons
  • Art prints
  • Audio tracks
  • Digital recipe collections

All of these are valuable to your fans because they’re unique offerings that only you can provide.

How to make and sell merch on YouTube

If you’re just starting out selling products as a YouTube creator, fan merch is a smart and cost-effective way to launch a store.

How to design your own merch for YouTube

he first big question you’ll have is what exactly you should put on your merchandise. The good news is you don’t need to be a skilled illustrator or graphic designer yourself to get your hands on unique, high-quality designs.

First, think about how the branding of your channel could translate into a design. You could use your logo, slogans you say during videos or even illustrations of your face.

Let’s take a look at Mythical, for example. Their YouTube channel, Good Mythical Morning, is known for its two hosts, Rhett and Link, as well as the games they play involving whacky food creations. 

Using that, they have merch that hits a variety of angles, such as:

  • A simple logo on a tie-dye t-shirt
  • Images of the hosts
  • References to inside jokes
  • Catchphrases
  • Custom illustrations

Taking those as inspiration, you can probably already imagine what merch would look like for your channel.

You can design your merch if you’re a savvy designer. If you’re not, there are plenty of places where you can find artists who can create designs for you.

Look at:

  • Shopify Experts
  • Fiverr
  • Dribbble
  • Designious
  • Tshirt factory
  • Creative Market

You can also try Shopify’s free logo maker if you’re just getting started with branding your channel.

By browsing through these sites you’re bound to find a designer whose style matches your vision for your own merch.

Set up your store

There are a variety of services available that court YouTube creators looking to sell merch. They streamline the process of selling merch, but the downside is that you have far less control over the look and feel of your shop, as well as what products you can sell.

Scott initially sold his merch on RedBubble, an on-demand printer, but ended up switching to Shopify so that he could sell apparel alongside products he created himself.

“We’re able to sell merch for the channel, but also produced for the channel, on one website, which is nice for the buying experience. You don’t have to go to different places to get different things,” he says.

Scott also says Shopify offers the advantage of being able to create a more complex website for his channel, with a blog and other information.

Using print on demand to make your merch

When you set up a Shopify store, you’ll have access to print-on-demand apps like Gelato, Printify, and Printful. You can also search through the Shopify App Store for more.

You’ll want to check out different printers and see what types of products they offer and where they ship to. All will offer a range of apparel, such as t-shirts and hoodies, as well as various materials, sizes, and colors. You can also look to see what other products they offer, like mugs, tumblers, mouse pads, or other home goods.

Once you choose a printer and add it as an app in your Shopify store, you can begin uploading your designs and placing them on products. You’ll then set a price and transfer the product to your store, where fans can start buying it.

The advantage of on-demand printing is that the printing service takes care of printing and shipping the orders, so your only job is to run and promote your shop. This takes away the hassle of sourcing items and printing products yourself, which means you don’t have to keep an inventory of items that may or may not sell right away.

How much do YouTubers make from merch sales?

Exactly how much money YouTube creators make is usually a closely guarded secret. Some creators are a little more open than others. Jeffree Star, for example, has often shown off his lavish lifestyle and alluded that his cosmetics line and merch business brings in millions.

On her SimplyNailogical podcast, Christine and partner Ben have said their nail polish business has a high volume of sales and is profitable, even with the cost of employees, warehousing, and designing custom bottles. 

In fairness though, these are celebrity-tier creators with millions of subscribers. You’re probably starting from somewhere smaller.

Scott says revenue can vary, but he estimates that up to 50% of his overall revenue is coming from online store sales.

To break that down, he says the majority of his revenue comes from products he created himself, including an exclusive miniature he had manufactured that he sells for $49.99, along with digital instruction for how to paint it. This makes up anywhere from 30% to 40% of his revenue.

The other 10% to 20% comes from more straightforward merchandise, like t-shirts and posters.

The rest of his revenue as a creator comes from a combination of ads on YouTube, Amazon affiliate links, Patreon, and sponsorships.

Scott says the key is being able to offer something unique. He said that, for example, someone who posts one video a week could make much more from product sales generated by a video than whatever it makes from ad placements.

“If you can create something that gives value to your audience, it’s a huge revenue stream,” he says.

It obviously stands to reason that the more you grow your subscribers and views, the more you can potentially make from merchandise sales. However, even a small creator has the potential to have a significant portion of their revenue come from those sales.

How to promote your merch on YouTube

Once you have merch available, your fans need to know about it.

Many creators will post a video announcing the launch of a merch line to get fans excited, as well as announce it on other platforms, such as Instagram or Twitter.

Moving forward, you should include a link to your store underneath all your videos, in your YouTube bio, and in your bio on other platforms as well. And don’t forget to make announcements when you add new items to your collection!

Grow your YouTube channel with merch

Getting started with selling merch as a YouTube creator doesn’t require having a ton of subscribers. You already have all the tools you need to start making income independent of YouTube and its algorithm, restrictions, and partner program.

Making it as a YouTube creator means creating a sustainable business that can thrive through whatever the platform throws your way, and starting your own shop can help get you there.

eBay launches new shop features

You may want to dabble with your eBay shop as eBay have released brand new features. They include a shops tab in Seller Hub, inventory strips, a marketing banner and more. These features have been announced as coming in the most recent eBay Seller Release. 

The new features are noweBay new shop features live and ready to assist you in using your shop to drive traffic and show off your products during the selling season. eBay shops now have: 

An allocated shop tab in Seller Hub

  • Access all the latest shop features and easily set up and manage your shop, from the Shop all about tab in Seller Hub

An About tab

  • Let your customers know all about you and what you offer in your shops About tab

Store Policies

  • Set expectations with your customers around your shipping and returns policies.

Inventory Strips

  • Choose which products your buyers see first by implementing up to 4 inventory strips, each with a maximum of 6 items. You can choose from topics such as ‘Featured items’, ‘Just In’, ‘Festive Collection’ and more.

Visual categories 

  • Add up to 6 categories, each with its own customer image, in a ‘shop by category’ area. 

Marketing banners

  • Get potential customers’ attention and highlight products, sales or promotions with marketing banners.

6 ways to stand out during Q4

After the huge growth of ecommerce during the pandemic, it is predicted that another substantial increase in online sales will occur during the approaching holiday months. Worldwide selling in Q4 will be more crucial than ever as Amazon has recently taken over two additional European markets, Poland and Sweden. 

Christine Lippmann, Ecommerce Marketing Specialist at InterCultural Elements, gives her recommendations for global selling in Q4. The 6 steps below represent how retailers can triumph global competition through the Q4 period. 

Global selling in Q4 

  1. Concentrate on your bestsellers and optimise listings

Analyse what you sell and the market you sell in cautiously. It is important to ask yourself, which items have sold the best on which market place? In order to rank as high as possible on the search result pages, focus on your bestsellers and spend time developing them to match the exact needs of the respective marketplace. Only use these optimised listings to new marketplaces, while also taking into account the target audience of the particular country in addition to the cultural differences. 

  1. Adapt your product descriptions to fit the local audience

Local sellers tend to be more favourable to customers, despite the huge range of products available on the market. A perfectly localised product description can have a great impact on a customer’s purchasing decision. Buyers want to know that if they face a problem, they are able to speak to someone in their own language. This is even more important in a new market or with an unfamiliar brand, customers can instantly trust a seller with a flawless translated listing. 

  1. Increase visibility with the right marketing campaigns and enhanced brand content

It is crucial that your customers can easily find your products. Your best selling products should be clearly emphasised with marketing campaigns and magnified brand content. A lot of customers will start buying presents earlier this year due to the delivery delays associated with supply shortages. Take advantage of this by investing in marketing campaigns ahead of Black Friday, while costs are lower. As a result, by the time the holiday sales begin, you will already have lots of positive customer feedback which leads to better product rankings. 

  1. Understand your customers 

A plain sailing customer service experience ensures your account doesn’t become prone to suspension. A well looked after FAQ section is great for common problems a customer may face. Ensure they are kept up to date and you’ll see a significantly reduced inflow of queries from customers. It is recommended that if you outsource any customer concerns if they are in a language you can’t comprehend. A pay-as-you-go service is a cost effective way of providing a multilingual customer service experience to your customers. However, make sure you contact them as soon as you can as capacity may be limited during the busy holiday season. 

  1. Keep your Amazon account healthy

Since the beginning of the pandemic, the occurrence of random account suspensions have become increasingly prevalent. Reasons have previously included: alleged multiple accounts, algorithm errors to hack attacks, sometimes the seller isn’t even at fault. Therefore, you should focus your efforts on things that you are able to control. For example, keep track of your performance figures, keep an eye on notifications or alerts and brush aside the importance of review ratings and delivery issues. Due to the fact that many sellers don’t value the importance of their account health, InterCultural Elements, a cross border trade service provider, has started offering a customised account health check service which involves regular checks every day. Their subscription plans even include account suspension appeals. 

  1. Get professional help in case of multilingual account suspension

An suspended account, especially during the busy selling period, can cause a lot of frustration as well as serious damage to your business. The only way you will be able to get back to selling your products online quickly is through a professional appeal written in the language the marketplace understands in line with Amazon’s specific guidelines and regulations. Don’t try complaints, pleas or threats as they will not work. It is worth your while investing in professional help from e-commerce experts who have experience in assisting in difficult appeals. They can help you get your account back quickly as every day that goes by without you selling costs you money, especially during the crucial holiday months. 

Intercultural Elements, an e-commerce expansion service, have been producing customisable international expansion strategies for retailers since 2007. The provider, based in Germany, recognises successful countries and marketplaces to target and offers multiple services such as multilingual customer service, translation, localisation and digital marketing. Not only this, but they also have an Amazon Suspension Appeal service and account health checks in multiple languages.  

Mule

a carrier broker that integrates with Shopify and more.

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Box Mart

Gift and retail packing

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Specialist Supplements

a supplier of quality organic and non-organic health foods, food supplements, vitamins, minerals and herbal formulations.

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VR Packaging

Mailing bag range is a cost-effective way to send out items in the post

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Washcare Labels

Specialising in the manufacturing and printing of Garment Care Labels.

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Storefront Graphics

Quality labels and workwear for the Trade

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Printed Pack

UK based packaging manufacturer

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Social Media & Email Marketing

https://vimeo.com/556117277…

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British SHEQ Services

Partner with organisations large and small and provide advice and guidance on managing business risk…

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Outdoor World

Outdoor World is a family run company supplying everything outdoors.

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SMS Marine

Supply all aspects of marine equipment and chandlery for boat owners, marinas, boatyards and commercial marine.

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Research analysis

Lucy is a research analyst and can offer help with topic research/finding articles etc.

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Amazon troubleshooting expert

Nicole Ross is an Amazon troubleshooting expert.

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How to start a t-shirt business

T-shirts aren’t just a staple of casual wear—they’re articles of clothing that often reflect our personalities, interests, and identities. If you cannot be bothered reading all this I will simplify: Research what’s trendingFiverr for design Shopify websitePrint on demand Add more designsEmail and social media marketing For the more analytical please read on… Selling t-shirts online has…

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The Ecommerce Club is designed to mentor members and enable collaboration between all parties. Not just help on your ecommerce journey but help on your business journey.

Print on demand business coming to the UK

Printful, located in Wolverhampton and Lodz in Poland, has signed leases for 2 additional print on demand fulfillment centers. The continued expansion of Printful will create over 100 new jobs during the first year with a further 200,000 sq. ft. of fulfillment space. 

Printful has 8 in-house establishments globally, three in Europe (two in Latvia and one in Spain). The business has grown to a workforce of over 700 employees in Europe and over 1,800 worldwide. Due to the growing market, ecommerce and print on demand services such as Printful are able to continue scaling by adding two more facilities in Europe. 

Printful offers a range of services, including printing onto clothing, accessories and home decor. The designs are created by you and are listed on your online store or market place. Your orders are then sent to Printful who are responsible for printing as well as shipping the items to the consumer. The advantage of using print on demand services for your business is that your reach will be significantly more, due to the worldwide shipping, with the ability to offer over 300 custom products. If you’re a graphic designer, this is a great business opportunity, due to the ready made business model, compared to someone who wants to keep stock, print and ship themselves. Once the UK fulfillment center is up and running, it will allow shipping to UK customers to be even quicker. 

“We chose the UK as our next location because it’s the largest ecommerce market in Europe. Printful has a loyal and growing base of customers in the UK who have anticipated our UK expansion for a while and we’re thrilled to finally do it. Additionally, it will allow us to significantly shorten shipping times within the UK, making it easy to reach many new customers.”

– Davis Siksnans, CEO & Co-Founder, Printful

Printful are currently hiring and it is estimated that the additional fulfillment centers will be functioning by the end of the year. 

Hermes and Tesco partner to expand Parcelshop network

Hermes and Tesco, the UK’s top consumer delivery company and major supermarket retailer, have announced their collaboration which will see Hermes Parcelshop services provided in Tesco’s convenience stores across the nation. From the 6th of September, Parcelshop services will launch in the first few stores and over the months following, a continuous roll-out will be set in motion. 

With Lockdown restrictions easing, Out of Home parcel delivery services such as Parcelshops and lockers, have seen an increase in popularity. Hermes has taken this opportunity to scale up it’s network, which will provide consumers with even easier options for sending, receiving and returning parcels. 

Currently, the Hermes Parcelshop legacy consists of more than 6,000 independent retailers, retail groups and lockers. By 2022, Hermes has predicted that 80% of the UK’s population will be able to access their closest Parcelshop or locker within a 10 minute walk. They have also forecasted that, through their Out of Home network, they will handle more than 80 million parcels this year.

“We’re really excited to announce our new partnership with Tesco, which will make Hermes ParcelShop services even more accessible to people across the UK, at a time when we know people are looking for maximum convenience and options for sending, receiving and returning their parcels. The last 18 months have demonstrated the importance of being able to meet ever-changing consumer demands when it comes to both online shopping and customer-to-customer sending, so we continue to invest in our infrastructure, technology and services to support the nation.”

– Kath Gill, Head of ParcelShop Services at Hermes